Mary Shelley believes herself a normal girl, like all the other orphans being raised in isolation at the Saint Albert’s School. As they approach their eleventh birthday, the only problem the students have is a growing plague of nightmares. Until they accidentally witness a public demonstration calling for an end to “splits,” a new type of man-made monster. Before their teacher can hustle them away, Mary snatches one of the demonstrators’ pamphlets and discovers that the protesters believe she and the other students are these splits.

Determined to find the truth, Mary pushes for answers and starts a chain of events that reveals the school’s dark secrets. The students find that each is linked with a different version of themselves by scientists who’ve discovered a way to exploit the mysterious physical principal of “entanglement.” This is what splits are, one mind split across two bodies. But most bizarre of all is that these other bodies aren’t on Earth, but have been genetically engineered to survive on a partially terraformed Mars. The bodies on Mars have been kept dormant as the children grew on Earth, but have recently started to wake; they are the source of the nightmares that plague the children.

Mary and her fellow students are meant to populate Mars with a workforce to finish the monumental task of terraforming a second home for the human race. But as they take on this task, they discover a dark side to the noble motivations they thought they served. Mary and the other splits are feared and loathed by the outside world, and treated as less-than-human by those inside the project. When events conspire to pressure the project to an accelerated timeline, the ugly underside of the whole plan shows through. Mary and the splits are forced to make decisions that put their lives in conflict with the plan for Mars. Mary finds herself backed into a corner where nothing less than the future of the human race depends on the decisions she makes.

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 Represented by Jessica Schmeidler.

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